Frances Goodman

"Untitled" / Edition 03 / $3,900

FRANCES GOODMAN (b.1975) is a South African artist who creates atmospheric and immersive sound pieces, photographs and sculptures that unveil everyday routines, obsessions and social interactions. Her work has been shown at the Armory in New York, Art Basel and Art Basel Miami Beach. More recently, she has returned from a residency in New York and a solo exhibition of her work, 'Touched' at (Art)Amalgamated, New York (2012). She lives and works from her home in Johannesburg.

artwork

How would you describe what you do?

I'm an artist who works with sound and sculpture, particularly 'soft sculpture' – sculpture which incorporates materials and processes that are considered quite feminine and 'crafty', from dressmaking to beadwork.

What role does craft play in your work?

I use craft in a tongue-in-cheek and irreverent way, referencing historical practices of women, but trying to subvert expectations around 'women's work'. A lot of my work deals with beauty and how we are a society that uses beauty and aesthetics to conceal something dark and festering underneath. That's why the surface or finish of my work is incredibly important – the fact that a lot of the pieces I create are beautifully finished and sparkling and almost 'too much' is integral to the work.

How important is it to you that you are involved in the actual making of your artworks?

I sometimes have people assist me, but it's very important to me that I'm involved in the process. So even if, because of time pressures, I have to hand over something to someone else to complete I will always be responsible for making the initial work. I don't hand anything over to a faceless factory. I think, in terms of my work, the human hand – the hand of the author – is very important. It relates to the obsessions and routines that are often the subject of my work.

How did you approach this project?

Looking at the other artists who were selected to contribute, it struck me that I needed to respond as a female artist. I wanted to make something that was going to stand out as being female, so that you would walk past it and say, "Oh, a woman made that one." In a way, surfing is quite a macho sport, but I was amazed by how female I found the form when it arrived at my studio and I wanted to play with that. I also liked the idea that, instead of having my artwork sealed under the laminated surface of the board, I would have something protrude from it. I've been looking at abstract expressionist painting recently, thinking of a female mark that would almost imitate those kinds of painterly marks – trying to translate something like a Pollock drip into something more feminine, something that would protrude from the surface rather than be dropped onto it.

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Richard Hart

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Michael McGarry

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Jonathan Barnbrook

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Asha Zero

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Olivier Schildt

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Anton Kannemeyer

Givan Lötz

Givan Lötz

Roelof Petrus Van Wyk

Roelof Van Wyk

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